Potato Oat Bread

Ever since Jay gave me an Irish cookbook for my birthday, I’ve been making all sorts of things from it. We’ve had Dublin Coddle (excuse the crap photos, thank you winter lighting), Soda Bread (I still have to post that recipe one of these days!), bacon and potato cakes, and now, Potato Oat Bread.

Potato Oat Bread

Rather than buying bread, I’ve gone back to making it myself. In spite of the fact I can no longer use my bread machine, because Sunbeam doesn’t sell replacement bread pans (and I’m not dropping money on a whole new bread machine just for a flipping bread pan), I make it using my stand mixer. Which is nice, because even though I don’t mind kneading, I can do other things while the mixer does the work for me.

Potato Oat Bread

As is evident by these pictures–You’re supposed to brush the loaf with water and sprinkle additional oats over the top before popping it into the oven. While the bread was hanging out and rising and whatever, I was cleaning up the kitchen and working on that evening’s dinner, so I forgot. I think they’re more for aesthetics anyway, or to let people know just by looking that “Hey, this bread has oats in it!”

Potato Oat Bread

Even so, still warm, with some Kerrygold Butter (because Irish) slathered on, it’s delicious! And it makes excellent toast.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Potato Oat Bread
 
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Cuisine: Irish
Serves: 1 loaf
Ingredients
  • 1 C mashed potatoes
  • 3½ C all-purpose flour
  • 1½ tsp salt
  • 3 Tbsp. butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1½ tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1½ Tbsp. packed dark brown sugar
  • 3 Tbsp. old-fashioned oats
  • 2 Tbsp. nonfat dried milk
  • 1 C warm water (110 -115 degrees F)
Optional:
  • 1 Tbsp. water
  • 1 Tbsp. old-fashioned oats
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together the salt and flour. Add the butter, and with clean hands, work in until the mixture starts to resemble coarse sand. Add in the yeast, sugar, oats, and dried milk. Using the paddle attachment, mix in the mashed potatoes. Slowly stream in the water, and mix until a soft dough forms.
  2. Switch to the dough hook, and knead for 5-10 minutes (mine took 8 minutes), or until the dough is smooth and elastic. Place the dough in an oiled bowl, turn to coat, and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm place for about an hour, or until doubled in size.
  3. Gently deflate the dough, and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead for 1 minute, then shape into a loaf. Place in a greased 9-inch loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes or until doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F during the second rise.
  4. If topping with the additional oats, brush the loaf with the Tbsp. of water, and scatter the oats over the top. Bake the bread for 25-30 minutes or until it sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. If it browns too much for your liking, cover with foil after 15 minutes.
  5. Immediately remove the bread from the pan and cool on a wire rack. Cool at least 20 minutes before slicing.

I purposely have even been making extra mashed potatoes, just to be able to have this bread on a regular basis. It’s that good!

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